Human Exposure To Vibration In Buildings (DIN 4150-2:1999-06 & DIN 45669-1:1995-06)

Standards DIN 4150-2:1999-06 and DIN 45669-1:1995-06 provide a means of assessing the effect on human beings of vibration caused by vehicle traffic, trains both above and below ground, construction work and occasional impulsive type vibration caused by, say, blasting and the like.

DIN 45669-1 describes the signal processing actions and DIN 4150-2 details how these are used. Provisions are included for day or night levels and for five categories of building:

  • Industrial
  • Predominantly Commercial
  • Mixed Commercial and Residential
  • Residential
  • Special Areas such as Hospitals

Where relevant the standards also make provision for rest periods in the daytime by giving these twice the importance. It is important therefore that the time of day at which recordings are made is kept with the data as is done with the Prosig P8000 series. The Prosig DATS software will then automatically analyse data into the three categories: Day, Rest Period and Night.

As well as computing the severity level and comparing it against the relevant limits then, if the level is too high when assessed on the existing exposure duration, it will also compute the permitted exposure time to meet the standard.

DIN 45669 gives two classes of accuracy for amplitude and phase and the computed values for specific test signals. These are Class 1 and Class 2 with Class 1 being the tightest requirement. The Prosig P8000 hardware and DATS software meets Class 1 requirements.

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Dr Colin Mercer

Chief Signal Processing Analyst at Prosig
Dr Colin Mercer was formerly at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR), University of Southampton where he founded the Data Analysis Centre. He then went on to found Prosig in 1977. Colin retired as Chief Signal Processing Analyst at Prosig in December 2016. He is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

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7 thoughts on “Human Exposure To Vibration In Buildings (DIN 4150-2:1999-06 & DIN 45669-1:1995-06)

  1. Jonathan

    Hello, I need to evaluate vibration levels on ships and I have read that the recommended weighting filter for the case is the KB filter, meeting DIN 45669-1. I would like to know your point of view about this. Best Regards from Lima, Peru. Jonathan

  2. Dr Colin Mercer Post author

    For ship vibrations my preference is to use ISO 6954:2000. This uses the Wm weighting. (Note Wm was previously known as WBC. It was re-designated in ISO2631-2:2003).

    For ships ISO 6954 classifies the result into passenger, crew and work areas. The processing and assessment criteria are very similar to often human body vibration methods.

    DIN45669 and DIN4150 together are used for building vibrations and the procedure uses a weighting known as HBnom. Processing is very different to IS0 6954. For instance IS0 6954, like most human vibration measures, requires an acceleration signal but DIN45669 uses velocity inputs.

    DIN45669 and DIN4150 are used in the assessment of the effects of vibration on human beings in buildings due to short term vibration, road traffic, rail traffic and construction work. Vibrations in ships are generally of a more constant nature and so ISO 6954 is more appropriate.

  3. Hanafi

    Hello, I need to study about vibration in bridge & viaduct. Which Standard that could I refer etc. I would like to know your point of view about this. Best Regards from Kuala Lumur, Malaysia
    – Hanafi

  4. Colin Mercer

    I presume this is the effect of vibration on people living or working on the bridge or viaduct. At first sight I would not have thought people would be working everyday in such a location. Could you clarity the situation further please.

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